A to Z Challenge -Y


 

Y -yellow

Sunflowers

Sunflowers

 

 

 

I know I used them before but they are yellow so I’m using them again. They are just so vibrant and sun-shiny!!!

 

 

 

 

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Just look at these beauties!  I have a couple of people asking me for bulbs once the flowers fade.

Until then, I am enjoying the show!

 

 

 

Yellow Road Lines Dividing The Center Of An Old Road

Yellow lines on the road. A sight that I see on most of these winding country back roads.

Y- Yarn.

20151215_07463120160210_074557Yarn – and look, one of them is even yellow! The three skeins in

<—this photo are for a Frank Lloyd Wright architect scarf for an auction event. —> This is what I do with leftover yarn, make cup cozies! Well, that and some other things. I’ve been cleaning  my basement, *shudders* and discovered that I am on the verge of being a hoarder with yarn. I’ve found 7 skeins of yarn that I forgot I had, 12 partial skeins leftover from other projects, and numerous scraps of partial skeins.  I didn’t count them, but  they filled a kitchen trash bag 3/4 full. Holy cow I’ve got a lot of yarn! Cup cozies for everyone!

I told you all before, I suffer from stuffitis! Apparently bordering on hoarding of yarn and craft stuff.  I could open a craft boutique in my basement if it was in order!  Is there such a thing as a  yarn addict support group? Because I may have a problem here. Maybe.

Write on my friends, write on!

Ellie

 

 

 

 

A to Z Challenge – F


I have two pictures to share. Two completely different F words.

FIRE

FIRE

FIRE

There is something soothing about sitting around a fire, listening to the crackling wood, roasting some hot dogs on the open flames, enjoying s’mores, and seeing the night sky. Where I live, there is little ground light so the stars are beautifully visible. The warmth of the fire against the slight chill of the night air is invigorating! Not to mention that I rather like the smell of wood smoke.

Fabric

Fabric

 

FABRIC

I have a craft project in the making and this is the gorgeous fabric that I found for it. I absolutely love the Paris and wine bottles! It doesn’t show up well in the photograph, but the white one has silver metallic designs.  Have I mentioned lately that I am a craftaholic?

Can’t wait to share the repurposed dragonflies that I made.  Right now they are drying. I might slip them in for Repurposed since D has already gone by.

I couldn’t decide on the next image, so I am going to ask a question instead:

What does FUN look like for you?

Write on my friends, write on!

Ellie

 

 

 

 

Show Me


How many times have you heard show don’t tell?

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In theory, it’s a simple matter.  In practice, it’s difficult to execute.

Being from the Show Me state,  I guess this was a natural fit for me. I remember in grade school when I had to give a verbal book report.  We were required to make a paper mache puppet for the main character and then act out a specific part of the story. This was in third grade, so keep that in mind.

My story:  The Three Little Pigs.

Always the overacheiver,  I couldn’t seperate my main characters. I’ve always had a passion for arts and crafts, so I made a cast of characters from  paper mache.  They were pitiful! Three pigs, formed around small balloons, one had spots, one was pink, and one had a bowtie.  I don’t know, I was a kid. Who knows what goes through the mind of a third grader, right?

The beginning steps of a pig.

The beginning steps of a pig.

Then there was the wolf – the antagonist. DUN DUN DUN!  Paper mache was formed around a lightbulb sized balloon. It had a snout, gnarly teeth, and  big ears.  I spent a lot of time getting this right.  All the other kids had one puppet, and I had four – bwahahahaha!  The teacher was not amused.

The next day, we got to paint them.  It was simple to paint the pigs. I’m pretty sure we used tempera paints not  the nice acrylics that are available now. Then I began painting my wolf.  Even as a child I was dramatic  and my wolf was the baddest baddie in the whole land.  His teeth were pearly white, with blood dripping down his jaw.  I stuck a patch of fake fur  from the top of his head down the back which attached to the simple fake fur clothes. (We had to make a draw string dress,  arms if your character required it.)  My pigs were  glued to popsicle sticks.  My wolf was the focus.

I gathered my props for presentation: a bit of straw,  a bit of clay and mud, and small pieces of bricks, then a cardboard setting colored with crayon because – we were third graders and we didn’t have markers. Finally, it was my turn.

My older brothers were into film making at the time,  and had recently filmed a “werewolf film” where I was one of the victims.  Chicken livers are great for special effects as well as homemade fake blood. Be careful what you expose your grade schoolers to, they remember everything. Stuck in the palm of my hand were small packets of karo syrup and food dye aka fake blood. The first little pig put up a little fight,  then suffered a brutal bloody demise. The teacher  gasped. The  student’s eyes were riveted.

The second pig, being a little smarter than the first, argued for a bit then fled to his oldest brothers home, but not without suffering a few nips along the way.

I embellished the story, adding a colorful twist when the hunters came and shot the wolf. It was a horrific bloody death. It was graphic, descriptive, and left my teacher white faced and wide eyed.  I recall some sort of note being pinned to my shirt when I went home.

The art of good storytelling is in the telling, not the story.  It would have been simple to repeat the words in the book.  It would have been easy to say: The big bad wolf blew down the house of straw, the house of mud and clay, but  he couldn’t blow down the third pig’s home.

The point is, showing is much better than telling.  I could have simply told you that as a grade schooler I was required to give a verbal book report for The Three Little Pigs and that I tried my best but the teacher was not amused. However,  I chose to paint you a word picture, describing the key points and the audience reaction.

Tomorrow,  I address showing the crush.  Whaaaaat?

Can you think of a time when you knew you were guilty of “telling” and another instance where you nailed the scene by “Showing”?

Please leave your comments below and write on my friends, write on!